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9 Things You Need to Know Before Starting a Juice Cleanse slideshow

9 Things You Need to Know Before Starting a Juice Cleanse slideshow


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Planning your time sans solid foods requires a little research and strategy

9 Things You Need to Know Before Starting a Juice Cleanse

Anyone can benefit from detoxifying his or her body every now and again, and over the past few years the trendiest way to do so has been via a juice cleanse. While some people purchase expensive, pre-bottled juices intended for a cleanse, others opt to make their own cleanse juices and smoothies at home.

Regardless of whether you make your own juices or purchase them, there are a few things that will happen to you while cleansing. What really happens to your body while on a juice cleanse (if you’re able to stick to consuming six or so juices daily for a while without cheating, that is) is a combination of craving reduction, toxin removal, and digestive system relief. Your body and mind will undergo significant changes while cleansing.

Just as there are guidelines for how you should eat after a cleanse, there are a few things you should know before starting. We’ve provided some tips and tricks that anyone should know and use in order get the most out of a juice cleanse.

Accountability Partners Will Help You

Fiber Intake Is Crucial to Digestion and Detoxification

It will be of the utmost important to keep your system flowing while you cleanse. While the liquefied vegetables you’ll be consuming should have a decent fiber content, many of the best high-fiber recipes are based on solid grains. If you’ve purchased cold-pressed juices, you’ll certainly be missing out on the nutrients and fiber found in fruit and vegetable skin. If you want to maintain the highest fiber intake possible during your cleanse, you need to blend your own fruits and vegetables rather than buying them juiced. Scheduling a colonic (or two, depending on the length of your cleanse) ahead of time will help ensure that your digestive system is as clean as a whistle.

Lemon Water Will Change Your Life

We’ve said it before and we’ll say it again: Putting a lemon in your water will change your life. While detoxing, you may think that highly acidic citrus fruits would be detrimental to your wellness goals. On the contrary, citrus fruits are only acidic when outside of the body; lemon becomes highly alkaline-forming when consumed. Hot water with lemon will help hydrate, satiate, and detoxify you during your cleanse. (Safety tip: Wash your lemons well before you squeeze them or drop slices into your water; they tend to be coated with particularly nasty pesticides.)

Make a Grocery List

You’ll want to plan out the juices you’ll be making each day if your cleanse actively involves juicing. With common juice ingredients including foods like kale, parsley, ginger, lemons, carrots, beets, spirulina, chia seeds, watermelon, berries, and more, you have no limit in terms of flavor options. It will behoove you to plan out what you’ll need for each and every juice during your cleanse ahead of time. If you’ve purchased a popular juice cleanse, knowing which juice is to be consumed and when is vital. We have some tips to save you a little cash featured in Expensive Juice Cleanses You Can DIY Cheaply at Home.

Optimize Skin Health

Due to their nutrient composition, many common juice and smoothie ingredients can actually help protect your skin from the sun. A great example of this is iron-rich spinach. By pairing juices and smoothies made from raw foods with skin products made without artificial ingredients, your skin will glow more brightly than it ever has before.

In The Daily Meal’s feature by Dr. Arleen Lamba, 5 Tips to Eat and Drink Your Way to a Healthy Spring Glow, Dr. Lamba speaks of the skin benefits one can experience by going on a raw food skin cleanse:

“Products with organic ingredients are best for people who have sensitive skin, congested skin, or adult-onset acne.”

Stock Up on Tea

Herbal teas are allowed on most juice cleanses as they are quite low in calories and can aid you along on your path to detoxification. Herbal teas can improve overall wellness, so stock up on teas such as chamomile, hibiscus, oolong, and lavender.

Track Your Emotions

Buy a notebook or journal before you start your cleanse. Note how you feel a few days before your cleanse so that you can look back afterward and see if the process was worth it. Has your skin cleared up? Were you starving the whole time, or did certain juices and smoothies help you feel full? Which smoothies tasted the best? The worst?

Yoga Will Help Your Mind and Body While Cleansing

In order to stay focused, we suggest meditating daily while on your juice cleanse. These 19 Best Yoga Poses for Digestion will help your head stay clear while also promoting a healthy digestive system.


Planning a Detox or Juice Cleanse? 5 Dos and Don&rsquots

Detoxes and cleanses have become so mainstream, you may feel like you&rsquore doing something wrong if you haven&rsquot tried at least one. But the truth is detoxes and cleanses aren&rsquot right for everyone, and they can even backfire.

Detoxes and cleanses have become so mainstream, you may feel like you&aposre doing something wrong if you haven&apost tried at least one. But the truth is detoxes and cleanses aren&apost right for everyone, and they can even backfire. The key to reaping the rewards is finding what works, and doesn&apost work, for you. Here are five dos and don&aposts, and real-life lessons I&aposve learned from my clients. Some of them may just surprise you.

Don&apost do it to be trendy
Even at the thought of being restricted, some of my clients experience intense cravings, or obsessive thoughts of food, and become more prone to binge eating. This is often the case for people who were put on diets as children, or have a history of strict dieting or disordered eating. While some people rave about how amazing they feel physically and emotionally during a cleanse, I&aposve seen others struggle with moodiness, irritability, depression, fatigue, constipation, constant thoughts of food, and rebound overeating. Striving to eat clean, all natural foods is fantastic, but you don&apost need to do a cleanse or detox to be healthy. If your body, mind, or both don&apost react well to limiting your diet, even for three, five, or seven days, don&apost put yourself through it.

Do choose a detox or cleanse that&aposs right for you
There&aposs no one standard definition of a cleanse or detox. For some, it means pressed juice only, and for others a cleanse can simply mean cutting out things like alcohol, caffeine, processed or refined foods, sugar, gluten, common allergens and animal protein. While super strict regimes are incredibly popular, most of my clients feel much more energized and satiated when they include lean protein, and/or raw veggies and fruits they can chew, rather than juices that are gone in a few gulps. It&aposs perfectly OK to "cherry pick" from various plans to create a program that feels right for you.

Don&apost pull a double whammy and work out too
Detoxes and cleanses are all about ending erratic, unhealthy eating, and rebooting and resetting your metabolism. This is much easier to do when you give your body a brief break from exercise. And trying to work out while following a limited eating plan can create unwanted side effects, because cleanses and detoxes generally don&apost provide the extra fuel needed for exercise, or the added raw materials required for healing and recovery. As a result, doing both can leave you feeling tired, dizzy, and nauseous. It can also result in breaking down muscle mass, which can up your injury risk and lower your metabolic rate, the exact opposite of what you&aposre aiming for.

Do use a detox or cleanse as a gateway to a healthier diet
In my experience, the greatest benefit to a detox or cleanse is its ability to start fresh, and transition to a long-term, healthy way of eating. Many of my clients, and people who have followed the "5 Day Fast Forward" cleanse from my latest book have told me that even within five days, their cravings for salty, fatty, or sweet foods disappear, they begin to appreciate the natural flavors of whole, fresh foods, and they&aposre able to reconnect with normal hunger and fullness cues. In addition, losing some pounds and inches quickly can create the motivation and confidence to embark on a longer journey. Finally, detoxes and cleanses prevent you from being able to act on your usual emotional, social, environmental, and habitual eating triggers, which can be the first step to breaking unhealthy patterns. All of these benefits can make committing to healthy goals—like cooking at home more often, eating breakfast each day, and bringing your lunch to work𠅊 whole lot easier.

Don&apost use a detox or cleanse as a way to purge
I&aposve seen numerous people get stuck in the trap of bouncing back and forth between a cleanse or detox and bouts of overindulging. Because cleanses and detoxes have become so popular, this seesaw syndrome can be socially acceptable. But emotionally, using cleanses and detoxes this way can become a lot like other methods of purging, including over-exercise, or taking laxatives or diuretics—it can feel like something you don&apost want to do, and know isn&apost healthy, but feel like you have to do, in order to undo the effects of overeating. If you&aposve found yourself on this roller coaster ride, reach out for help. While black and white, all or nothing relationships with food are common, they aren&apost good for you physically or emotionally, and striking a sustainable, healthy balance is possible.

What&aposs your take on this topic? How do cleanses and detoxes make you feel? Please tweet your thoughts to @CynthiaSass and @goodhealth


Planning a Detox or Juice Cleanse? 5 Dos and Don&rsquots

Detoxes and cleanses have become so mainstream, you may feel like you&rsquore doing something wrong if you haven&rsquot tried at least one. But the truth is detoxes and cleanses aren&rsquot right for everyone, and they can even backfire.

Detoxes and cleanses have become so mainstream, you may feel like you&aposre doing something wrong if you haven&apost tried at least one. But the truth is detoxes and cleanses aren&apost right for everyone, and they can even backfire. The key to reaping the rewards is finding what works, and doesn&apost work, for you. Here are five dos and don&aposts, and real-life lessons I&aposve learned from my clients. Some of them may just surprise you.

Don&apost do it to be trendy
Even at the thought of being restricted, some of my clients experience intense cravings, or obsessive thoughts of food, and become more prone to binge eating. This is often the case for people who were put on diets as children, or have a history of strict dieting or disordered eating. While some people rave about how amazing they feel physically and emotionally during a cleanse, I&aposve seen others struggle with moodiness, irritability, depression, fatigue, constipation, constant thoughts of food, and rebound overeating. Striving to eat clean, all natural foods is fantastic, but you don&apost need to do a cleanse or detox to be healthy. If your body, mind, or both don&apost react well to limiting your diet, even for three, five, or seven days, don&apost put yourself through it.

Do choose a detox or cleanse that&aposs right for you
There&aposs no one standard definition of a cleanse or detox. For some, it means pressed juice only, and for others a cleanse can simply mean cutting out things like alcohol, caffeine, processed or refined foods, sugar, gluten, common allergens and animal protein. While super strict regimes are incredibly popular, most of my clients feel much more energized and satiated when they include lean protein, and/or raw veggies and fruits they can chew, rather than juices that are gone in a few gulps. It&aposs perfectly OK to "cherry pick" from various plans to create a program that feels right for you.

Don&apost pull a double whammy and work out too
Detoxes and cleanses are all about ending erratic, unhealthy eating, and rebooting and resetting your metabolism. This is much easier to do when you give your body a brief break from exercise. And trying to work out while following a limited eating plan can create unwanted side effects, because cleanses and detoxes generally don&apost provide the extra fuel needed for exercise, or the added raw materials required for healing and recovery. As a result, doing both can leave you feeling tired, dizzy, and nauseous. It can also result in breaking down muscle mass, which can up your injury risk and lower your metabolic rate, the exact opposite of what you&aposre aiming for.

Do use a detox or cleanse as a gateway to a healthier diet
In my experience, the greatest benefit to a detox or cleanse is its ability to start fresh, and transition to a long-term, healthy way of eating. Many of my clients, and people who have followed the "5 Day Fast Forward" cleanse from my latest book have told me that even within five days, their cravings for salty, fatty, or sweet foods disappear, they begin to appreciate the natural flavors of whole, fresh foods, and they&aposre able to reconnect with normal hunger and fullness cues. In addition, losing some pounds and inches quickly can create the motivation and confidence to embark on a longer journey. Finally, detoxes and cleanses prevent you from being able to act on your usual emotional, social, environmental, and habitual eating triggers, which can be the first step to breaking unhealthy patterns. All of these benefits can make committing to healthy goals—like cooking at home more often, eating breakfast each day, and bringing your lunch to work𠅊 whole lot easier.

Don&apost use a detox or cleanse as a way to purge
I&aposve seen numerous people get stuck in the trap of bouncing back and forth between a cleanse or detox and bouts of overindulging. Because cleanses and detoxes have become so popular, this seesaw syndrome can be socially acceptable. But emotionally, using cleanses and detoxes this way can become a lot like other methods of purging, including over-exercise, or taking laxatives or diuretics—it can feel like something you don&apost want to do, and know isn&apost healthy, but feel like you have to do, in order to undo the effects of overeating. If you&aposve found yourself on this roller coaster ride, reach out for help. While black and white, all or nothing relationships with food are common, they aren&apost good for you physically or emotionally, and striking a sustainable, healthy balance is possible.

What&aposs your take on this topic? How do cleanses and detoxes make you feel? Please tweet your thoughts to @CynthiaSass and @goodhealth


Planning a Detox or Juice Cleanse? 5 Dos and Don&rsquots

Detoxes and cleanses have become so mainstream, you may feel like you&rsquore doing something wrong if you haven&rsquot tried at least one. But the truth is detoxes and cleanses aren&rsquot right for everyone, and they can even backfire.

Detoxes and cleanses have become so mainstream, you may feel like you&aposre doing something wrong if you haven&apost tried at least one. But the truth is detoxes and cleanses aren&apost right for everyone, and they can even backfire. The key to reaping the rewards is finding what works, and doesn&apost work, for you. Here are five dos and don&aposts, and real-life lessons I&aposve learned from my clients. Some of them may just surprise you.

Don&apost do it to be trendy
Even at the thought of being restricted, some of my clients experience intense cravings, or obsessive thoughts of food, and become more prone to binge eating. This is often the case for people who were put on diets as children, or have a history of strict dieting or disordered eating. While some people rave about how amazing they feel physically and emotionally during a cleanse, I&aposve seen others struggle with moodiness, irritability, depression, fatigue, constipation, constant thoughts of food, and rebound overeating. Striving to eat clean, all natural foods is fantastic, but you don&apost need to do a cleanse or detox to be healthy. If your body, mind, or both don&apost react well to limiting your diet, even for three, five, or seven days, don&apost put yourself through it.

Do choose a detox or cleanse that&aposs right for you
There&aposs no one standard definition of a cleanse or detox. For some, it means pressed juice only, and for others a cleanse can simply mean cutting out things like alcohol, caffeine, processed or refined foods, sugar, gluten, common allergens and animal protein. While super strict regimes are incredibly popular, most of my clients feel much more energized and satiated when they include lean protein, and/or raw veggies and fruits they can chew, rather than juices that are gone in a few gulps. It&aposs perfectly OK to "cherry pick" from various plans to create a program that feels right for you.

Don&apost pull a double whammy and work out too
Detoxes and cleanses are all about ending erratic, unhealthy eating, and rebooting and resetting your metabolism. This is much easier to do when you give your body a brief break from exercise. And trying to work out while following a limited eating plan can create unwanted side effects, because cleanses and detoxes generally don&apost provide the extra fuel needed for exercise, or the added raw materials required for healing and recovery. As a result, doing both can leave you feeling tired, dizzy, and nauseous. It can also result in breaking down muscle mass, which can up your injury risk and lower your metabolic rate, the exact opposite of what you&aposre aiming for.

Do use a detox or cleanse as a gateway to a healthier diet
In my experience, the greatest benefit to a detox or cleanse is its ability to start fresh, and transition to a long-term, healthy way of eating. Many of my clients, and people who have followed the "5 Day Fast Forward" cleanse from my latest book have told me that even within five days, their cravings for salty, fatty, or sweet foods disappear, they begin to appreciate the natural flavors of whole, fresh foods, and they&aposre able to reconnect with normal hunger and fullness cues. In addition, losing some pounds and inches quickly can create the motivation and confidence to embark on a longer journey. Finally, detoxes and cleanses prevent you from being able to act on your usual emotional, social, environmental, and habitual eating triggers, which can be the first step to breaking unhealthy patterns. All of these benefits can make committing to healthy goals—like cooking at home more often, eating breakfast each day, and bringing your lunch to work𠅊 whole lot easier.

Don&apost use a detox or cleanse as a way to purge
I&aposve seen numerous people get stuck in the trap of bouncing back and forth between a cleanse or detox and bouts of overindulging. Because cleanses and detoxes have become so popular, this seesaw syndrome can be socially acceptable. But emotionally, using cleanses and detoxes this way can become a lot like other methods of purging, including over-exercise, or taking laxatives or diuretics—it can feel like something you don&apost want to do, and know isn&apost healthy, but feel like you have to do, in order to undo the effects of overeating. If you&aposve found yourself on this roller coaster ride, reach out for help. While black and white, all or nothing relationships with food are common, they aren&apost good for you physically or emotionally, and striking a sustainable, healthy balance is possible.

What&aposs your take on this topic? How do cleanses and detoxes make you feel? Please tweet your thoughts to @CynthiaSass and @goodhealth


Planning a Detox or Juice Cleanse? 5 Dos and Don&rsquots

Detoxes and cleanses have become so mainstream, you may feel like you&rsquore doing something wrong if you haven&rsquot tried at least one. But the truth is detoxes and cleanses aren&rsquot right for everyone, and they can even backfire.

Detoxes and cleanses have become so mainstream, you may feel like you&aposre doing something wrong if you haven&apost tried at least one. But the truth is detoxes and cleanses aren&apost right for everyone, and they can even backfire. The key to reaping the rewards is finding what works, and doesn&apost work, for you. Here are five dos and don&aposts, and real-life lessons I&aposve learned from my clients. Some of them may just surprise you.

Don&apost do it to be trendy
Even at the thought of being restricted, some of my clients experience intense cravings, or obsessive thoughts of food, and become more prone to binge eating. This is often the case for people who were put on diets as children, or have a history of strict dieting or disordered eating. While some people rave about how amazing they feel physically and emotionally during a cleanse, I&aposve seen others struggle with moodiness, irritability, depression, fatigue, constipation, constant thoughts of food, and rebound overeating. Striving to eat clean, all natural foods is fantastic, but you don&apost need to do a cleanse or detox to be healthy. If your body, mind, or both don&apost react well to limiting your diet, even for three, five, or seven days, don&apost put yourself through it.

Do choose a detox or cleanse that&aposs right for you
There&aposs no one standard definition of a cleanse or detox. For some, it means pressed juice only, and for others a cleanse can simply mean cutting out things like alcohol, caffeine, processed or refined foods, sugar, gluten, common allergens and animal protein. While super strict regimes are incredibly popular, most of my clients feel much more energized and satiated when they include lean protein, and/or raw veggies and fruits they can chew, rather than juices that are gone in a few gulps. It&aposs perfectly OK to "cherry pick" from various plans to create a program that feels right for you.

Don&apost pull a double whammy and work out too
Detoxes and cleanses are all about ending erratic, unhealthy eating, and rebooting and resetting your metabolism. This is much easier to do when you give your body a brief break from exercise. And trying to work out while following a limited eating plan can create unwanted side effects, because cleanses and detoxes generally don&apost provide the extra fuel needed for exercise, or the added raw materials required for healing and recovery. As a result, doing both can leave you feeling tired, dizzy, and nauseous. It can also result in breaking down muscle mass, which can up your injury risk and lower your metabolic rate, the exact opposite of what you&aposre aiming for.

Do use a detox or cleanse as a gateway to a healthier diet
In my experience, the greatest benefit to a detox or cleanse is its ability to start fresh, and transition to a long-term, healthy way of eating. Many of my clients, and people who have followed the "5 Day Fast Forward" cleanse from my latest book have told me that even within five days, their cravings for salty, fatty, or sweet foods disappear, they begin to appreciate the natural flavors of whole, fresh foods, and they&aposre able to reconnect with normal hunger and fullness cues. In addition, losing some pounds and inches quickly can create the motivation and confidence to embark on a longer journey. Finally, detoxes and cleanses prevent you from being able to act on your usual emotional, social, environmental, and habitual eating triggers, which can be the first step to breaking unhealthy patterns. All of these benefits can make committing to healthy goals—like cooking at home more often, eating breakfast each day, and bringing your lunch to work𠅊 whole lot easier.

Don&apost use a detox or cleanse as a way to purge
I&aposve seen numerous people get stuck in the trap of bouncing back and forth between a cleanse or detox and bouts of overindulging. Because cleanses and detoxes have become so popular, this seesaw syndrome can be socially acceptable. But emotionally, using cleanses and detoxes this way can become a lot like other methods of purging, including over-exercise, or taking laxatives or diuretics—it can feel like something you don&apost want to do, and know isn&apost healthy, but feel like you have to do, in order to undo the effects of overeating. If you&aposve found yourself on this roller coaster ride, reach out for help. While black and white, all or nothing relationships with food are common, they aren&apost good for you physically or emotionally, and striking a sustainable, healthy balance is possible.

What&aposs your take on this topic? How do cleanses and detoxes make you feel? Please tweet your thoughts to @CynthiaSass and @goodhealth


Planning a Detox or Juice Cleanse? 5 Dos and Don&rsquots

Detoxes and cleanses have become so mainstream, you may feel like you&rsquore doing something wrong if you haven&rsquot tried at least one. But the truth is detoxes and cleanses aren&rsquot right for everyone, and they can even backfire.

Detoxes and cleanses have become so mainstream, you may feel like you&aposre doing something wrong if you haven&apost tried at least one. But the truth is detoxes and cleanses aren&apost right for everyone, and they can even backfire. The key to reaping the rewards is finding what works, and doesn&apost work, for you. Here are five dos and don&aposts, and real-life lessons I&aposve learned from my clients. Some of them may just surprise you.

Don&apost do it to be trendy
Even at the thought of being restricted, some of my clients experience intense cravings, or obsessive thoughts of food, and become more prone to binge eating. This is often the case for people who were put on diets as children, or have a history of strict dieting or disordered eating. While some people rave about how amazing they feel physically and emotionally during a cleanse, I&aposve seen others struggle with moodiness, irritability, depression, fatigue, constipation, constant thoughts of food, and rebound overeating. Striving to eat clean, all natural foods is fantastic, but you don&apost need to do a cleanse or detox to be healthy. If your body, mind, or both don&apost react well to limiting your diet, even for three, five, or seven days, don&apost put yourself through it.

Do choose a detox or cleanse that&aposs right for you
There&aposs no one standard definition of a cleanse or detox. For some, it means pressed juice only, and for others a cleanse can simply mean cutting out things like alcohol, caffeine, processed or refined foods, sugar, gluten, common allergens and animal protein. While super strict regimes are incredibly popular, most of my clients feel much more energized and satiated when they include lean protein, and/or raw veggies and fruits they can chew, rather than juices that are gone in a few gulps. It&aposs perfectly OK to "cherry pick" from various plans to create a program that feels right for you.

Don&apost pull a double whammy and work out too
Detoxes and cleanses are all about ending erratic, unhealthy eating, and rebooting and resetting your metabolism. This is much easier to do when you give your body a brief break from exercise. And trying to work out while following a limited eating plan can create unwanted side effects, because cleanses and detoxes generally don&apost provide the extra fuel needed for exercise, or the added raw materials required for healing and recovery. As a result, doing both can leave you feeling tired, dizzy, and nauseous. It can also result in breaking down muscle mass, which can up your injury risk and lower your metabolic rate, the exact opposite of what you&aposre aiming for.

Do use a detox or cleanse as a gateway to a healthier diet
In my experience, the greatest benefit to a detox or cleanse is its ability to start fresh, and transition to a long-term, healthy way of eating. Many of my clients, and people who have followed the "5 Day Fast Forward" cleanse from my latest book have told me that even within five days, their cravings for salty, fatty, or sweet foods disappear, they begin to appreciate the natural flavors of whole, fresh foods, and they&aposre able to reconnect with normal hunger and fullness cues. In addition, losing some pounds and inches quickly can create the motivation and confidence to embark on a longer journey. Finally, detoxes and cleanses prevent you from being able to act on your usual emotional, social, environmental, and habitual eating triggers, which can be the first step to breaking unhealthy patterns. All of these benefits can make committing to healthy goals—like cooking at home more often, eating breakfast each day, and bringing your lunch to work𠅊 whole lot easier.

Don&apost use a detox or cleanse as a way to purge
I&aposve seen numerous people get stuck in the trap of bouncing back and forth between a cleanse or detox and bouts of overindulging. Because cleanses and detoxes have become so popular, this seesaw syndrome can be socially acceptable. But emotionally, using cleanses and detoxes this way can become a lot like other methods of purging, including over-exercise, or taking laxatives or diuretics—it can feel like something you don&apost want to do, and know isn&apost healthy, but feel like you have to do, in order to undo the effects of overeating. If you&aposve found yourself on this roller coaster ride, reach out for help. While black and white, all or nothing relationships with food are common, they aren&apost good for you physically or emotionally, and striking a sustainable, healthy balance is possible.

What&aposs your take on this topic? How do cleanses and detoxes make you feel? Please tweet your thoughts to @CynthiaSass and @goodhealth


Planning a Detox or Juice Cleanse? 5 Dos and Don&rsquots

Detoxes and cleanses have become so mainstream, you may feel like you&rsquore doing something wrong if you haven&rsquot tried at least one. But the truth is detoxes and cleanses aren&rsquot right for everyone, and they can even backfire.

Detoxes and cleanses have become so mainstream, you may feel like you&aposre doing something wrong if you haven&apost tried at least one. But the truth is detoxes and cleanses aren&apost right for everyone, and they can even backfire. The key to reaping the rewards is finding what works, and doesn&apost work, for you. Here are five dos and don&aposts, and real-life lessons I&aposve learned from my clients. Some of them may just surprise you.

Don&apost do it to be trendy
Even at the thought of being restricted, some of my clients experience intense cravings, or obsessive thoughts of food, and become more prone to binge eating. This is often the case for people who were put on diets as children, or have a history of strict dieting or disordered eating. While some people rave about how amazing they feel physically and emotionally during a cleanse, I&aposve seen others struggle with moodiness, irritability, depression, fatigue, constipation, constant thoughts of food, and rebound overeating. Striving to eat clean, all natural foods is fantastic, but you don&apost need to do a cleanse or detox to be healthy. If your body, mind, or both don&apost react well to limiting your diet, even for three, five, or seven days, don&apost put yourself through it.

Do choose a detox or cleanse that&aposs right for you
There&aposs no one standard definition of a cleanse or detox. For some, it means pressed juice only, and for others a cleanse can simply mean cutting out things like alcohol, caffeine, processed or refined foods, sugar, gluten, common allergens and animal protein. While super strict regimes are incredibly popular, most of my clients feel much more energized and satiated when they include lean protein, and/or raw veggies and fruits they can chew, rather than juices that are gone in a few gulps. It&aposs perfectly OK to "cherry pick" from various plans to create a program that feels right for you.

Don&apost pull a double whammy and work out too
Detoxes and cleanses are all about ending erratic, unhealthy eating, and rebooting and resetting your metabolism. This is much easier to do when you give your body a brief break from exercise. And trying to work out while following a limited eating plan can create unwanted side effects, because cleanses and detoxes generally don&apost provide the extra fuel needed for exercise, or the added raw materials required for healing and recovery. As a result, doing both can leave you feeling tired, dizzy, and nauseous. It can also result in breaking down muscle mass, which can up your injury risk and lower your metabolic rate, the exact opposite of what you&aposre aiming for.

Do use a detox or cleanse as a gateway to a healthier diet
In my experience, the greatest benefit to a detox or cleanse is its ability to start fresh, and transition to a long-term, healthy way of eating. Many of my clients, and people who have followed the "5 Day Fast Forward" cleanse from my latest book have told me that even within five days, their cravings for salty, fatty, or sweet foods disappear, they begin to appreciate the natural flavors of whole, fresh foods, and they&aposre able to reconnect with normal hunger and fullness cues. In addition, losing some pounds and inches quickly can create the motivation and confidence to embark on a longer journey. Finally, detoxes and cleanses prevent you from being able to act on your usual emotional, social, environmental, and habitual eating triggers, which can be the first step to breaking unhealthy patterns. All of these benefits can make committing to healthy goals—like cooking at home more often, eating breakfast each day, and bringing your lunch to work𠅊 whole lot easier.

Don&apost use a detox or cleanse as a way to purge
I&aposve seen numerous people get stuck in the trap of bouncing back and forth between a cleanse or detox and bouts of overindulging. Because cleanses and detoxes have become so popular, this seesaw syndrome can be socially acceptable. But emotionally, using cleanses and detoxes this way can become a lot like other methods of purging, including over-exercise, or taking laxatives or diuretics—it can feel like something you don&apost want to do, and know isn&apost healthy, but feel like you have to do, in order to undo the effects of overeating. If you&aposve found yourself on this roller coaster ride, reach out for help. While black and white, all or nothing relationships with food are common, they aren&apost good for you physically or emotionally, and striking a sustainable, healthy balance is possible.

What&aposs your take on this topic? How do cleanses and detoxes make you feel? Please tweet your thoughts to @CynthiaSass and @goodhealth


Planning a Detox or Juice Cleanse? 5 Dos and Don&rsquots

Detoxes and cleanses have become so mainstream, you may feel like you&rsquore doing something wrong if you haven&rsquot tried at least one. But the truth is detoxes and cleanses aren&rsquot right for everyone, and they can even backfire.

Detoxes and cleanses have become so mainstream, you may feel like you&aposre doing something wrong if you haven&apost tried at least one. But the truth is detoxes and cleanses aren&apost right for everyone, and they can even backfire. The key to reaping the rewards is finding what works, and doesn&apost work, for you. Here are five dos and don&aposts, and real-life lessons I&aposve learned from my clients. Some of them may just surprise you.

Don&apost do it to be trendy
Even at the thought of being restricted, some of my clients experience intense cravings, or obsessive thoughts of food, and become more prone to binge eating. This is often the case for people who were put on diets as children, or have a history of strict dieting or disordered eating. While some people rave about how amazing they feel physically and emotionally during a cleanse, I&aposve seen others struggle with moodiness, irritability, depression, fatigue, constipation, constant thoughts of food, and rebound overeating. Striving to eat clean, all natural foods is fantastic, but you don&apost need to do a cleanse or detox to be healthy. If your body, mind, or both don&apost react well to limiting your diet, even for three, five, or seven days, don&apost put yourself through it.

Do choose a detox or cleanse that&aposs right for you
There&aposs no one standard definition of a cleanse or detox. For some, it means pressed juice only, and for others a cleanse can simply mean cutting out things like alcohol, caffeine, processed or refined foods, sugar, gluten, common allergens and animal protein. While super strict regimes are incredibly popular, most of my clients feel much more energized and satiated when they include lean protein, and/or raw veggies and fruits they can chew, rather than juices that are gone in a few gulps. It&aposs perfectly OK to "cherry pick" from various plans to create a program that feels right for you.

Don&apost pull a double whammy and work out too
Detoxes and cleanses are all about ending erratic, unhealthy eating, and rebooting and resetting your metabolism. This is much easier to do when you give your body a brief break from exercise. And trying to work out while following a limited eating plan can create unwanted side effects, because cleanses and detoxes generally don&apost provide the extra fuel needed for exercise, or the added raw materials required for healing and recovery. As a result, doing both can leave you feeling tired, dizzy, and nauseous. It can also result in breaking down muscle mass, which can up your injury risk and lower your metabolic rate, the exact opposite of what you&aposre aiming for.

Do use a detox or cleanse as a gateway to a healthier diet
In my experience, the greatest benefit to a detox or cleanse is its ability to start fresh, and transition to a long-term, healthy way of eating. Many of my clients, and people who have followed the "5 Day Fast Forward" cleanse from my latest book have told me that even within five days, their cravings for salty, fatty, or sweet foods disappear, they begin to appreciate the natural flavors of whole, fresh foods, and they&aposre able to reconnect with normal hunger and fullness cues. In addition, losing some pounds and inches quickly can create the motivation and confidence to embark on a longer journey. Finally, detoxes and cleanses prevent you from being able to act on your usual emotional, social, environmental, and habitual eating triggers, which can be the first step to breaking unhealthy patterns. All of these benefits can make committing to healthy goals—like cooking at home more often, eating breakfast each day, and bringing your lunch to work𠅊 whole lot easier.

Don&apost use a detox or cleanse as a way to purge
I&aposve seen numerous people get stuck in the trap of bouncing back and forth between a cleanse or detox and bouts of overindulging. Because cleanses and detoxes have become so popular, this seesaw syndrome can be socially acceptable. But emotionally, using cleanses and detoxes this way can become a lot like other methods of purging, including over-exercise, or taking laxatives or diuretics—it can feel like something you don&apost want to do, and know isn&apost healthy, but feel like you have to do, in order to undo the effects of overeating. If you&aposve found yourself on this roller coaster ride, reach out for help. While black and white, all or nothing relationships with food are common, they aren&apost good for you physically or emotionally, and striking a sustainable, healthy balance is possible.

What&aposs your take on this topic? How do cleanses and detoxes make you feel? Please tweet your thoughts to @CynthiaSass and @goodhealth


Planning a Detox or Juice Cleanse? 5 Dos and Don&rsquots

Detoxes and cleanses have become so mainstream, you may feel like you&rsquore doing something wrong if you haven&rsquot tried at least one. But the truth is detoxes and cleanses aren&rsquot right for everyone, and they can even backfire.

Detoxes and cleanses have become so mainstream, you may feel like you&aposre doing something wrong if you haven&apost tried at least one. But the truth is detoxes and cleanses aren&apost right for everyone, and they can even backfire. The key to reaping the rewards is finding what works, and doesn&apost work, for you. Here are five dos and don&aposts, and real-life lessons I&aposve learned from my clients. Some of them may just surprise you.

Don&apost do it to be trendy
Even at the thought of being restricted, some of my clients experience intense cravings, or obsessive thoughts of food, and become more prone to binge eating. This is often the case for people who were put on diets as children, or have a history of strict dieting or disordered eating. While some people rave about how amazing they feel physically and emotionally during a cleanse, I&aposve seen others struggle with moodiness, irritability, depression, fatigue, constipation, constant thoughts of food, and rebound overeating. Striving to eat clean, all natural foods is fantastic, but you don&apost need to do a cleanse or detox to be healthy. If your body, mind, or both don&apost react well to limiting your diet, even for three, five, or seven days, don&apost put yourself through it.

Do choose a detox or cleanse that&aposs right for you
There&aposs no one standard definition of a cleanse or detox. For some, it means pressed juice only, and for others a cleanse can simply mean cutting out things like alcohol, caffeine, processed or refined foods, sugar, gluten, common allergens and animal protein. While super strict regimes are incredibly popular, most of my clients feel much more energized and satiated when they include lean protein, and/or raw veggies and fruits they can chew, rather than juices that are gone in a few gulps. It&aposs perfectly OK to "cherry pick" from various plans to create a program that feels right for you.

Don&apost pull a double whammy and work out too
Detoxes and cleanses are all about ending erratic, unhealthy eating, and rebooting and resetting your metabolism. This is much easier to do when you give your body a brief break from exercise. And trying to work out while following a limited eating plan can create unwanted side effects, because cleanses and detoxes generally don&apost provide the extra fuel needed for exercise, or the added raw materials required for healing and recovery. As a result, doing both can leave you feeling tired, dizzy, and nauseous. It can also result in breaking down muscle mass, which can up your injury risk and lower your metabolic rate, the exact opposite of what you&aposre aiming for.

Do use a detox or cleanse as a gateway to a healthier diet
In my experience, the greatest benefit to a detox or cleanse is its ability to start fresh, and transition to a long-term, healthy way of eating. Many of my clients, and people who have followed the "5 Day Fast Forward" cleanse from my latest book have told me that even within five days, their cravings for salty, fatty, or sweet foods disappear, they begin to appreciate the natural flavors of whole, fresh foods, and they&aposre able to reconnect with normal hunger and fullness cues. In addition, losing some pounds and inches quickly can create the motivation and confidence to embark on a longer journey. Finally, detoxes and cleanses prevent you from being able to act on your usual emotional, social, environmental, and habitual eating triggers, which can be the first step to breaking unhealthy patterns. All of these benefits can make committing to healthy goals—like cooking at home more often, eating breakfast each day, and bringing your lunch to work𠅊 whole lot easier.

Don&apost use a detox or cleanse as a way to purge
I&aposve seen numerous people get stuck in the trap of bouncing back and forth between a cleanse or detox and bouts of overindulging. Because cleanses and detoxes have become so popular, this seesaw syndrome can be socially acceptable. But emotionally, using cleanses and detoxes this way can become a lot like other methods of purging, including over-exercise, or taking laxatives or diuretics—it can feel like something you don&apost want to do, and know isn&apost healthy, but feel like you have to do, in order to undo the effects of overeating. If you&aposve found yourself on this roller coaster ride, reach out for help. While black and white, all or nothing relationships with food are common, they aren&apost good for you physically or emotionally, and striking a sustainable, healthy balance is possible.

What&aposs your take on this topic? How do cleanses and detoxes make you feel? Please tweet your thoughts to @CynthiaSass and @goodhealth


Planning a Detox or Juice Cleanse? 5 Dos and Don&rsquots

Detoxes and cleanses have become so mainstream, you may feel like you&rsquore doing something wrong if you haven&rsquot tried at least one. But the truth is detoxes and cleanses aren&rsquot right for everyone, and they can even backfire.

Detoxes and cleanses have become so mainstream, you may feel like you&aposre doing something wrong if you haven&apost tried at least one. But the truth is detoxes and cleanses aren&apost right for everyone, and they can even backfire. The key to reaping the rewards is finding what works, and doesn&apost work, for you. Here are five dos and don&aposts, and real-life lessons I&aposve learned from my clients. Some of them may just surprise you.

Don&apost do it to be trendy
Even at the thought of being restricted, some of my clients experience intense cravings, or obsessive thoughts of food, and become more prone to binge eating. This is often the case for people who were put on diets as children, or have a history of strict dieting or disordered eating. While some people rave about how amazing they feel physically and emotionally during a cleanse, I&aposve seen others struggle with moodiness, irritability, depression, fatigue, constipation, constant thoughts of food, and rebound overeating. Striving to eat clean, all natural foods is fantastic, but you don&apost need to do a cleanse or detox to be healthy. If your body, mind, or both don&apost react well to limiting your diet, even for three, five, or seven days, don&apost put yourself through it.

Do choose a detox or cleanse that&aposs right for you
There&aposs no one standard definition of a cleanse or detox. For some, it means pressed juice only, and for others a cleanse can simply mean cutting out things like alcohol, caffeine, processed or refined foods, sugar, gluten, common allergens and animal protein. While super strict regimes are incredibly popular, most of my clients feel much more energized and satiated when they include lean protein, and/or raw veggies and fruits they can chew, rather than juices that are gone in a few gulps. It&aposs perfectly OK to "cherry pick" from various plans to create a program that feels right for you.

Don&apost pull a double whammy and work out too
Detoxes and cleanses are all about ending erratic, unhealthy eating, and rebooting and resetting your metabolism. This is much easier to do when you give your body a brief break from exercise. And trying to work out while following a limited eating plan can create unwanted side effects, because cleanses and detoxes generally don&apost provide the extra fuel needed for exercise, or the added raw materials required for healing and recovery. As a result, doing both can leave you feeling tired, dizzy, and nauseous. It can also result in breaking down muscle mass, which can up your injury risk and lower your metabolic rate, the exact opposite of what you&aposre aiming for.

Do use a detox or cleanse as a gateway to a healthier diet
In my experience, the greatest benefit to a detox or cleanse is its ability to start fresh, and transition to a long-term, healthy way of eating. Many of my clients, and people who have followed the "5 Day Fast Forward" cleanse from my latest book have told me that even within five days, their cravings for salty, fatty, or sweet foods disappear, they begin to appreciate the natural flavors of whole, fresh foods, and they&aposre able to reconnect with normal hunger and fullness cues. In addition, losing some pounds and inches quickly can create the motivation and confidence to embark on a longer journey. Finally, detoxes and cleanses prevent you from being able to act on your usual emotional, social, environmental, and habitual eating triggers, which can be the first step to breaking unhealthy patterns. All of these benefits can make committing to healthy goals—like cooking at home more often, eating breakfast each day, and bringing your lunch to work𠅊 whole lot easier.

Don&apost use a detox or cleanse as a way to purge
I&aposve seen numerous people get stuck in the trap of bouncing back and forth between a cleanse or detox and bouts of overindulging. Because cleanses and detoxes have become so popular, this seesaw syndrome can be socially acceptable. But emotionally, using cleanses and detoxes this way can become a lot like other methods of purging, including over-exercise, or taking laxatives or diuretics—it can feel like something you don&apost want to do, and know isn&apost healthy, but feel like you have to do, in order to undo the effects of overeating. If you&aposve found yourself on this roller coaster ride, reach out for help. While black and white, all or nothing relationships with food are common, they aren&apost good for you physically or emotionally, and striking a sustainable, healthy balance is possible.

What&aposs your take on this topic? How do cleanses and detoxes make you feel? Please tweet your thoughts to @CynthiaSass and @goodhealth


Planning a Detox or Juice Cleanse? 5 Dos and Don&rsquots

Detoxes and cleanses have become so mainstream, you may feel like you&rsquore doing something wrong if you haven&rsquot tried at least one. But the truth is detoxes and cleanses aren&rsquot right for everyone, and they can even backfire.

Detoxes and cleanses have become so mainstream, you may feel like you&aposre doing something wrong if you haven&apost tried at least one. But the truth is detoxes and cleanses aren&apost right for everyone, and they can even backfire. The key to reaping the rewards is finding what works, and doesn&apost work, for you. Here are five dos and don&aposts, and real-life lessons I&aposve learned from my clients. Some of them may just surprise you.

Don&apost do it to be trendy
Even at the thought of being restricted, some of my clients experience intense cravings, or obsessive thoughts of food, and become more prone to binge eating. This is often the case for people who were put on diets as children, or have a history of strict dieting or disordered eating. While some people rave about how amazing they feel physically and emotionally during a cleanse, I&aposve seen others struggle with moodiness, irritability, depression, fatigue, constipation, constant thoughts of food, and rebound overeating. Striving to eat clean, all natural foods is fantastic, but you don&apost need to do a cleanse or detox to be healthy. If your body, mind, or both don&apost react well to limiting your diet, even for three, five, or seven days, don&apost put yourself through it.

Do choose a detox or cleanse that&aposs right for you
There&aposs no one standard definition of a cleanse or detox. For some, it means pressed juice only, and for others a cleanse can simply mean cutting out things like alcohol, caffeine, processed or refined foods, sugar, gluten, common allergens and animal protein. While super strict regimes are incredibly popular, most of my clients feel much more energized and satiated when they include lean protein, and/or raw veggies and fruits they can chew, rather than juices that are gone in a few gulps. It&aposs perfectly OK to "cherry pick" from various plans to create a program that feels right for you.

Don&apost pull a double whammy and work out too
Detoxes and cleanses are all about ending erratic, unhealthy eating, and rebooting and resetting your metabolism. This is much easier to do when you give your body a brief break from exercise. And trying to work out while following a limited eating plan can create unwanted side effects, because cleanses and detoxes generally don&apost provide the extra fuel needed for exercise, or the added raw materials required for healing and recovery. As a result, doing both can leave you feeling tired, dizzy, and nauseous. It can also result in breaking down muscle mass, which can up your injury risk and lower your metabolic rate, the exact opposite of what you&aposre aiming for.

Do use a detox or cleanse as a gateway to a healthier diet
In my experience, the greatest benefit to a detox or cleanse is its ability to start fresh, and transition to a long-term, healthy way of eating. Many of my clients, and people who have followed the "5 Day Fast Forward" cleanse from my latest book have told me that even within five days, their cravings for salty, fatty, or sweet foods disappear, they begin to appreciate the natural flavors of whole, fresh foods, and they&aposre able to reconnect with normal hunger and fullness cues. In addition, losing some pounds and inches quickly can create the motivation and confidence to embark on a longer journey. Finally, detoxes and cleanses prevent you from being able to act on your usual emotional, social, environmental, and habitual eating triggers, which can be the first step to breaking unhealthy patterns. All of these benefits can make committing to healthy goals—like cooking at home more often, eating breakfast each day, and bringing your lunch to work𠅊 whole lot easier.

Don&apost use a detox or cleanse as a way to purge
I&aposve seen numerous people get stuck in the trap of bouncing back and forth between a cleanse or detox and bouts of overindulging. Because cleanses and detoxes have become so popular, this seesaw syndrome can be socially acceptable. But emotionally, using cleanses and detoxes this way can become a lot like other methods of purging, including over-exercise, or taking laxatives or diuretics—it can feel like something you don&apost want to do, and know isn&apost healthy, but feel like you have to do, in order to undo the effects of overeating. If you&aposve found yourself on this roller coaster ride, reach out for help. While black and white, all or nothing relationships with food are common, they aren&apost good for you physically or emotionally, and striking a sustainable, healthy balance is possible.

What&aposs your take on this topic? How do cleanses and detoxes make you feel? Please tweet your thoughts to @CynthiaSass and @goodhealth


Watch the video: Diashow Bilder 4K Video (June 2022).


Comments:

  1. Wycliff

    Bullshit

  2. Thierry

    what?

  3. Faolan

    Thank you, the post is truly sensibly written and to the point, there is something to learn.

  4. Shelton

    It seems brilliant phrase to me is

  5. Kagagrel

    And the main thing is well chewed

  6. Kajirg

    It also worries me about this issue.



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